The new sign-language book café is the first of its kind in Myanmar. Read this information to know more about it.
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World

In Myanmar, sign-language café signals change for good

By Mratt Kyaw Thu / Yangon (Myanmar) / At The Able café in downtown Yangon, there is plenty of conversation, yet it is almost completely silent.

The new sign-language book café is the first of its kind in Myanmar, and staffed entirely by deaf people.

Founder Ko Myo Kyaw Thu, 30, is hoping it will spark positive change. He wants to raise awareness of disabilities, “inspire others to start similar businesses” and “empower inclusivity.”

The initiative was a long time in the making, but its opening came in time for the International Day of Sign Languages on Sep. 23.

“I’ve been discussing for a long time about establishing something to help people with disabilities. I talk to everyone I meet about my idea,” said Ko Myo Kyaw Thu.

Ko Myo Kyaw Thu works as a consultant with international organizations but after seeing difficulties that people with disabilities experience while working in mainstream environments, he wanted to do something to help.

After talking to friends who run online bookshops, they found a space and some discounted furniture and opened The Able.

Currently, six deaf people are employed full time in the establishment.

According to a 2014 census, there are 670,000 deaf people across the country and no record of the percentage of deaf people who are currently employed.

They are mostly working in the hospitality industry as well as in laundries and as cleaners, and according to the research of Yadana Aung, who is also deaf and a teacher and researcher for the deaf community, there are also some bank and computer employees as well as mechanics.

Yadana Aung collects employment discrimination testimonies within communities of those with disabilities, which include reports of working more overtime than able-bodied people, lower pay, and humiliation, among other problems.

“I like working here as all staff members are deaf,” The Able’s chef Ko Ye Lwin Oo tells EFE, adding that he has experienced two workplaces where deaf people were subjected to “degrading” treatment when communicating.

The 33-year-old says he has had a love of cooking since he watched shows about it on television when he was 11. He learned more through working in a hotel and watching YouTube clips about bar-tending.

Ko Myo Kyaw Thu said while in the future the team would like to get funding, for now they are enjoying developing the business model and helping the deaf community.

The team aims to open more branches around Yangon and believe the awareness of people with disabilities will spread along with their business model.

There are more than 300 different sign languages used by the world’s estimated 72 million deaf people, more than 80 percent of whom are from developing countries, according to the World Federation of the Deaf. (September 20, 2019, EFE/Practica Español)

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Comprehension

Lee la noticia y responde a las preguntas (Read the news and answer the questions)

Congratulations - you have completed Lee la noticia y responde a las preguntas (Read the news and answer the questions). You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.
Question 1
Principalmente, en el texto se habla... (Mainly in the text, it's talked about...)
A
de la celebración del día internacional de las lenguas de signos.
B
de una cafetería en la que solo trabajan personas sordas.
C
del número de personas sordas que hay en todo el mundo.
Question 2
Sobre esta cafetería se dice que... (About this café, it's said that...)
A
fue fundada inspirándose en un negocio similar en Birmania para fomentar la inclusión de personas sordas.
B
fue fundada no solo para dar una oportunidad laboral a las personas sordas sino también para fomentar su inclusión.
C
algunos de sus empleados reconocen que no están muy contentos por trabajar ahí.
Question 3
En el texto se dice que... (It's said in the text that...)
A
actualmente la mitad de los habitantes de Birmania tiene una discapacidad que afecta a la audición.
B
se desmiente que las personas sordas sean discriminadas en Birmania.
C
hay cientos de lenguas de signos diferentes en todo el mundo.
Question 4
El dueño de 'The Able' ya ha abierto más cafeterías como esta. (The owner of 'The Able' has already opened more cafés like this.)
A
Así es.
B
¡Imposible saberlo!
C
En absoluto.
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There are 4 questions to complete.

Vocabulary

Congratulations - you have completed . You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.
Question 1
'Apenas' significa... ('Apenas' means...)    
A
'suficiente'.
B
'casi no'.
C
'en exceso'.
Question 2
La palabra 'inclusividad' está relacionada con... (The word 'inclusividad' is related to...)  
A
la inclusión de alguien dentro de un grupo.
B
el hecho de querer estar apartado.
C
el hecho de no estar interesado en algo.
Question 3
'Discriminación' es... ('Discriminación' is...)  
A
una acción realizada para evitar que una persona reciba un trato desigual.
B
el trato desigual que recibe una persona por su raza, sexo, etc.
C
una ayuda que se da a una persona que no ha recibido un trato justo.
Question 4
En el texto, 'tratar de' es... (In the text, 'tratar de' is...)  
A
'intentar algo'.
B
'evitar algo'. 
C
'comunicarse con alguien'.
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